To collect child support you must first have a court order from a divorce, dissolution, establishment of paternity, legal separation or other type of court order.

All states have a Child Support Enforcement Agency that is federally funded under the Federal Title IV‑D program and must help you collect support if your children are under 18, or if you applied for help before the child turned 18 for a maximum $25 application fee.

This agency must provide you with a “free” attorney if needed. Contact your Welfare Dept. and ask for the name and the address of the Government Child Support Agency. See the list here.

The following provides you with very basic information to help you get started in your pursuit of justice for your children ( please read all, so you don’t miss a section(s) that can help you):

If you do not have a court order for child support: You can contact your local child support enforcement agency and request that they establish an order. This can be done by establishing paternity (fatherhood) if you were not married. They can establish an order for you if you are separated or have been deserted. You can also do this through a private attorney or by representing yourself in court. If you need to establish paternity (fatherhood), go to paternity

  1.  NON‑PAYOR IS EMPLOYED: Wage withholding (payroll deduction) is available. Income (wage) withholding is available at the time of divorce or when paternity is established.
  2. NON‑PAYOR IS UNEMPLOYED: Unemployment Compensation is attachable for child support under Federal Law, or ask for a contempt hearing. At the hearing, you can request the court to issue an order that the non‑payor is to seek employment and provide proof to the court that he/she is looking for work.
  1. NON‑PAYOR IS AN UNDER‑THE‑TABLE EARNER: You can request the child support agency or a private attorney to do a credit check to determine assets.

You can request that the court issue a judgement for the back support. If the nonpayer has any assets, you can execute the judgement against a house, car, motorcycle, etc. (you can collect interest on the judgement).

  1. NON‑PAYOR LIVES OUT OF STATE: You can request the child support agency to process Interest wage withholding if the employer of non‑payor is known.
  •  UIFSA (Uniform Interstate Family Support Act), to establish or enforce an order.

5.   NON‑PAYOR IS SELF‑EMPLOYED

  • Federal Law requires that states have a law for posting a bond to ensure payment.
  • File criminal non‑support charges at county attorney’s offices (punishments and requirements vary from state to state).
  1. NON‑PAYOR IS NOT FOLLOWING COURT ORDER TO PAY OR PROVIDE HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE CHILD: You can request a contempt hearing to seek enforcement through the child support agency or private attorney, or represent yourself.
  1. NON‑PAYOR OWES BACK SUPPORT:
  1. NON‑PAYOR OWES ALIMONY IN ADDITION TO CHILD SUPPORT: Your local child support agency, private attorney, or you, through self-representation, can obtain enforcement through various means such as wage withholding and judgements.
  1. NON‑PAYOR OWES THE WELFARE DEPARTMENT BACK CHILD SUPPORT AND OWES YOU BACK CHILD SUPPORT. Under Federal Laws, you receive back support before the welfare department receives support owed to them. The welfare department cannot take your current child support payments unless you receive TANF benefits. The state is not entitled to more money in back support than they gave you in TANF benefits.
  1. YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE THE NON‑PAYOR IS: Your local child support agency can do a State Parent Locator (checks state department of taxation, social security, bureau of employment, etc.), if you know the state where the non‑payor lives or works. If the state is unknown, the child support agency can do a Federal Parent Locator (checks IRS, Social Security Administration, Department of Labor, etc.), for all 50 states.
  1. NON‑PAYOR PLACES ASSETS IN SOMEONE ELSE’S NAME: You must prove fraudulent conveyance. This means the non‑payor purposely hid assets (see fraudulent conveyance).

 

 

 

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https://aces-childsupport.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/iStock_000004544472XSmall.jpghttps://aces-childsupport.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/iStock_000004544472XSmall-150x150.jpgACESHow to Collect Child Supportchild support enforcement,DIY,government child support agencies,how to collect child uspport,self helpTo collect child support you must first have a court order from a divorce, dissolution, establishment of paternity, legal separation or other type of court order. All states have a Child Support Enforcement Agency that is federally funded under the Federal Title IV‑D program and must help you collect support...