“Under Washington State guidelines since we were not married, a DNA had to be taken by all parties. In July 2004, my son and I had taken our DNA tests, by this time my son was 2 years old. The father finally submitted to the DNA testing in December 2004 due to court order. The DNA test confirmed him being the biological father of my son.”

– Kristen, mother of Daniel

(NEEDED WHEN THE MOTHER AND FATHER ARE NOT MARRIED―PATERNITY IS THE PROCESS FOR ESTABLISHING FATHERHOOD)

Paternity can be established by:

The father signing a voluntary acknowledgment of paternity at the hospital when the baby is born.

The father signed a voluntary acknowledgment of paternity at other locations, such as the WIC office, Health Department, government child support agency, etc.

If there is no voluntary acknowledgment, the man denies or questions paternity, or does nothing, and you have an open case at the government child support agency, they must subpoena the man to take a DNA test to determine fatherhood.

If the DNA test is positive the administrative hearing officer at the government child support agency or court should enter an order (issue a paternity decree), stating that the man is the child’s father.

If the alleged father no-shows to the DNA test, and/or administrative hearing, the government child support agency should schedule the case for a court hearing to establish paternity by default. Default means the man was legally served a notice that he was being named the father but took no action, such as showing up for the hearing, taking the DNA test, etc.

If the man no-shows at court but was legally served―the court should issue a default paternity order. If the man appears at court, a DNA test can be done on the spot, or an order can be issued for the man to take a DNA test.

DNA genetic testing is done by testing the mother, the alleged father, and the child. Usually, the DNA sample is gathered by swabbing the inside of the mouth. If a DNA test shows that the man is the father of the child, a court or administrative order should be issued stating the man is the father of the child. The order should also include:

  • Date when the support obligation began (birth or present age of the child).
  • The amount of support to be paid (based on state child support guidelines).
  • Medical support provisions for health insurance, deductibles, and unreimbursed expenses. Usually, there is also a provision for medical bills incurred for the child’s birth.
  • Arrangements for parenting time/visitation.After paternity and a child support order are established, all the same remedies used for divorced families are available to you to enforce your child support order.

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https://aces-childsupport.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/baby-asian.jpghttps://aces-childsupport.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/baby-asian-150x150.jpgACESHow to Collect Child Supportfatherhood,legitimate,paternity“Under Washington State guidelines since we were not married, a DNA had to be taken by all parties. In July 2004, my son and I had taken our DNA tests, by this time my son was 2 years old. The father finally submitted to the DNA testing in December...